EAGLE 1795-1797 Small Eagle Reverse

1795 gold eagle coin 1795 gold eagle coin

Description

As was the case with many early gold coins, few numbers of this coin were produced as compared to later issues. Again, no proof coins were produced as there seemed to be little demand for such high priced collectibles that would carry substantial premiums to the face value. Eagles or $10 pieces made their first appearance in circulation toward the end of 1795.

The design of the first issue is similar to that of the contemporary half eagle. On the obverse Miss Liberty is shown wearing a cloth cap, facing right, with stars to the left and right. The reverse, copied from the design of an ancient cameo, depicts an eagle perched on a palm branch holding a wreath aloft in its beak. The inscription UNITED STATES OF AMERICA surrounds. There is no indication of denomination or value on this or the subsequent eagle type.

With a total mintage of fewer than 15,000 pieces, eagles of this design type are rare today. However, with some searching, attractive Very Fine to AU coins can be located.

Valuation

Occasionally, Uncirculated pieces appear. It usually means the sale of a great collection has taken place.
COIN NAME
EAGLE 1795-1797 Small Eagle Reverse
DESIGNED BY
Robert Scot
ISSUE DATE
1795-1797
COMPOSITION
0.9167 part gold, 0.0833 part copper
DIAMETER
33 mm
WEIGHT
270 grains
EDGE
Reeded
BUS MINT
13,344
PROOF MINT
None

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