$20 St. Gaudens

20 dollar St. Gaudens Gold Double Eagle Coin 20 dollar St. Gaudens Gold Double Eagle Coin

Description

After the High Relief version of this coin was produced in early 1907, this version was produced for business circulation. Its relief was made shallower making the coin less susceptible to wear during the course of business transactions. This design however, did not last long. President Theodore Roosevelt objected strongly to the use of God's name in the motto. A subsequent act of Congress replaced the motto and made way for the production of tens of millions of the more popular "with motto" coin.

The general design remains the same as on the previous High Relief issues and depicts Miss Liberty striding forward, with rays and the Capitol building in the background, LIBERTY above, and the date, now expressed in Arabic numerals, to the lower right. The reverse is similar and depicts an eagle flying to the left over the sun, with UNITED STATES OF AMERICA and TWENTY DOLLARS in two lines above. Around the obverse border of all Saint-Gaudens $20 issues is a circle of stars, 46 stars on those minted from 1907 through 1911 and 48 stars on those made from 1912 through 1933.

Valuation

Uncirculated pieces are encountered, but superb Uncirculated coins are decidedly scarce.

COIN NAME
$20 St. Gaudens
DESIGNED BY
Augustus Saint-Gaudens
ISSUE DATE
1933
COMPOSITION
0.900 part gold, 0.100 part copper
DIAMETER
34 mm
WEIGHT
516 grains
EDGE
Lettered E PLURIBUS UNUM
BUS MINT
5,294,968
PROOF MINT
Fewer than 5

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